Wednesday, March 13, 2019

The ISAPA Conference: Part 2 An Interview with a Research Presenter Dr. Justin Haegele

Welcome back to the What's New in Adapted Physical Education (APE) podcast/blog page! In this episode we will continue our conversation about the International Symposium of Adapted Physical Activity (ISAPA) and APE at an international level with former guest Dr. Justin Haegele, an APE assistant professor from Old Dominion University. Within this conversation, Dr. Haegele shares why he believes that ISAPA is a great conference for teachers, pre-service teachers, and higher education professionals to attend. In addition, Dr. Haegele discusses some aspects of the research he will be sharing at ISAPA, which focuses on how he used the social justice theory of intersectionality to examine how male adults with visual impairments perceive their physical education experiences. If you are interested in the 2019 ISAPA and seeing other valuable research and practitioner presentations, check out their website at: http://isapa2019.org/index.shtml. Finally, this episode is part 2 of a 3-part series. In the next episode we will Ann Griffin from Grantwood AEA on to discuss more about the ISAPA conference and her intended presentations.

Friday, February 22, 2019

The ISAPA Conference: Part 1 An Interview with the ISAPA President Dr. Martin Block

Welcome back to the What's New in Adapted Physical Education (APE) podcast/blog page! In today's very special episode we had an interview with Dr. Martin Block about the International Symposium of Adapted Physical Activity (ISAPA) and APE at an international level. Dr. Block is a professor of APE and co-director of the Masters program in APE at the University of Virginia, where he has been since 1992. In addition to these roles, Dr. Block also serves as the President of the International Federation of Adapted Physical Activity (IFAPA). IFAPA is an organization of adapted physical activity professionals and students from all around the world. Currently, IFAPA is working on expanding their webpage to help promote their goals of disseminating information about conferences, programs, research studies, and other news related to adapted physical activity. The long term goal of IFAPA is to create an international network of researchers for collaboration to advance the field of adapted physical activity, which is discussed in the podcast.


Also discussed in this podcast is the ISAPA, which acts under IFAPA, will return to the United States this year (2019) for the first time since 1992. It will be held June 14th through 18th in Charlottesville, Virginia. This year’s theme is Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. The goal for ISAPA is to bring international researchers together to share their research in hopes of learning about what is going on in other countries. This podcast covers IFAPA and ISAPA, and differences in APE between the United States and other countries. It also covers the gap between research and practitioners in APE, and what IFAPA is doing to address this gap. For more information on IFAPA, you can visit their website at: http://ifapa.net


If you are interested in the 2019 ISAPA, check out their website at: http://isapa2019.org/index.shtml

Finally, this episode is part 1 of a 2-part series. In the next episode we will have Dr. Justin Haegele from the University of Old Dominion and Ann Griffin from Grantwood AEA on to discuss more about the ISAPA conference and their intended presentations.















This blog post was written by Kylie Wilson, a graduate assistant in the Kinesiology Department at the University of Northern Iowa

Monday, February 11, 2019

Inclusion vs. integrated physical education: A discussion with Dr. Justin Haegele

Hello podcasters and welcome back for a brand new episode of What's New in Adapted Physical Education (APE)! For this episode we had a very special discussion with Dr. Justin Haegele, an APE assistant professor from Old Dominion University. For this episode, Dr. Haegele and I had an in-depth discussion about his research in the field of APE, and the differences between the terms 'inclusion' and 'integration' in relation to physical education. We discussed how 'inclusion' fits within special education laws, as well as he questions whether an 'integrated' setting/placement is always the best fit for students with disabilities. Dr. Haegele feels strongly that in the field of physical education, we often misuse the term 'inclusion' as a setting/placement, rather than as a philosophy that can be used regardless of setting/placement that can drive one's teaching practices. 






A research opportunity: 

I am conducting a study to examine the motivational factors for listening to educational podcasts. This study consists of completing a short 20-minute survey. To participate in the study, you must be in the field of education (e.g., pre-service teacher, higher education professor, education administrator, practicing teacher, related service provider) and have listened to an educational podcast. 

If you are interested in participating in this study, please visit [https://tinyurl.com/ycljfqqa to Informed Consent and Demographic Survey] to find out more. If you have any additional questions or concerns, please email Dr. Scott McNamara at the University of Northern Iowa at scott.mcnamara@Uni.edu.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Lakeshore Foundation: A leader in advocacy, programming, and research in adapted physical activity


The Lakeshore Foundation is an organization aimed instilling lifelong wellness in people with disabilities and those with chronic health conditions through a variety of means. The organization provides its members opportunities both within their Birmingham, Alabama facility and out in their respective communities to learn and practice physical activities, sports, and recreational activities. I had the chance to interview two people directly involved in the Lakeshore Foundation.  Beth Curry is the Chief Program Officer and works with the physical activity programs. Beth earned her Masters of Physical Therapy from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1984 before pursuing a career in healthcare. The other interviewee is Lisa Hillborn, who serves as the director or recreation and athletics. Within the interview we discuss how the Lakeshore Foundation came to be, how they work with adapted physical activity specialists throughout the nation, their involvement with the Olympics and Paralympics, and their endeavors in advocacy and research.

 The Lakeshore Foundation serves more that 4000 people with disabilities and chronic health conditions per year. Some of the activities they offer include aquatics, fitness, recreation and leisure sports, as well as services for military members who have sustained physical injuries. Their Birmingham facility also hosts U.S. Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls in their training. In addition, Lakeshore is a world leader in research, and has partnered with the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The research they conduct focuses on improving quality of life for those with disabilities and chronic health conditions. Some of their research focus is on rehabilitation and sport science research, but also includes research in policy and service efforts for the people they serve. Lakeshore also seeks to promote public awareness for their members, particularly through influencing policy makers to implement changes that better reflect the wants and needs of their members. They are vested in local, national, and global initiatives, from providing durable medical equipment access locally to the rights of persons with disabilities in sports globally. These initiatives have also made them a world leader in advocacy for those whom they serve.

For more information about the Lakeshore Foundation and the services they offer, you can visit their website at: http://www.lakeshore.org






An Additional Podcast on Assistive Technology and APE

I had the opportunity to be a guest on episode #398 of the Assisted Technology Update. This podcast is hosted by Josh Anderson, with the INDATA Project at Easter Seals Crossroads in Indianapolis, Indiana, which discusses new technology coming out for assistive purposes. In this podcast, I was able to discuss my background in APE and the podcast What’s New in APE. I also talk about what APE is, why it is important, what it takes to be qualified to teach APE, and a general overview on the state of APE in the United States. In relation to adapted technology, I discuss technology and assistive devices that APE teachers can use with students, and why these devices are important. Other topics on this podcast include a glove designed to interpret sign language, and a conversation about the five finalists in the global mobility limited challenge.

To listen to more Assisted Technology Update podcasts, visit: https://www.eastersealstech.com/category/assistive-tech-update/

If you’re interested in learning more about the Easter Seals Tech and the services they offer, visit their website at: https://www.eastersealstech.com   

Friday, December 21, 2018

Introduction APE Course: From the Undergraduates' Perception

Hello and happy holidays! For this episode of What’s New in APE, I was able to interview two of my undergraduate
students (John Nagel & Landon Kilmesh) who recently completed the introduction to APE course that I teach at the
University of Northern Iowa. This was also my first semester teaching the introduction to APE course at the University
of Northern Iowa, as well as it was the first semester that we had a service learning component on campus, where our
undergraduate physical education students were able to teach physical education to students with disabilities at the
university. During this episode we were all able to reflect on the introduction to APE course, discuss how this class
helped to prepare them to teach physical education to students with disabilities, and how working with students with
disabilities helps to change our perceptions on life and ourselves.


Stayed tuned to more What's New in APE podcasts, as we are scheduled to record a new episode with the LakeShore
Foundation in early January. Once again, I hope all of you have an extra wonderful holiday and we will see you in the
new year!

Sunday, December 9, 2018

National Adapted Physical Education Conference (NAPEC): Where Did We Come From & Where Are We Going

Hello! This episode of What’s New in APE is a second recording from the 47th Annual National Adapted Physical Education Conference
(NAPEC). The conference was held November 8-10, 2018 in San Diego, California. It is put on by the California Association for Health,
Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD), who advocates for healthy lifestyles for all. As an annual conference,
overarching themes for the weekend change from year to year. The 2018 theme was inclusion, and featured a variety of speakers that
addressed the theme in light of numerous APE topics.


The main topic discussed in this episode is the history of NAPEC, what it has accomplished since its’ inception, and the future of NAPEC.
The guests on this episode include Marci Pope (Lecturer at California State University-Chico), Rebecca Lytle (Professor at California State
University-Chico), Barry Lavay (Professor at California State University - Long Beach), Kathy Russell (School Administrator at
Los Angeles County Office of Education), and Joanie Verderber (Retired APE professor). In addition, at the end of the episode, the panel
took questions from the audience about NAPEC and related items.  



If you would like to learn more about NAPEC, visit their website here. NAPEC’s parent organization, the California Association for Health,
Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD), also has various information and resources for PE teachers, and can be found
here.

If you want to hear more from the 2018 NAPEC, check out the previous episode: The power of connectedness as educators and the state of
Adapted Physical Education: NAPEC Keynote

Please share this podcast and blog with anyone who you think may benefit from learning more about APE. Thank you for continuing to listen
and support What’s New in APE!

Monday, November 12, 2018

The power of connectedness as educators and the state of Adapted Physical Education: NAPEC Keynote


This is a recording of the first live podcast at the 47th Annual National Adapted Physical Education Conference (NAPEC) in San Diego, California. The conference’s parent organization is the California Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD). The conference itself provides valuable content about the field of APE as well as a wide professional network of friends and colleagues. This conference is unique in that it exemplifies what it means to be a community working towards similar goals.   

Dr. McNamara served as one of the conference’s keynote speakers. In the first part of the podcast, Dr. McNamara discusses his background and experiences with the “What’s New in APE” podcast. He touches on the power of connectedness as educators, including how to use our individual platforms and leadership skills to push the field of APE forward in a meaningful way.  

In the second part of the podcast, a panel of experts discusses the current state of the field of APE and current barriers. The panel consists of Dr. Rebecca Liddel (California State University-Chico, Dr. Beth Foster (Cal Poly–Pomona), Chris Ahrens (APE teacher for San Diego Unified School District and a former Paralympic Athlete), and Ann Griffin (APE consultant in Iowa). They touch on what is going well in terms of legislation, specifically in light of the conference theme of inclusion.


To access the PowerPoint slides that aligned with the presentation, please click here.

For more information on NAPEC, visit the CAHPERD page at: https://www.cahperd.org

For a direct link to the conference home page, visit: https://www.cahperd.org/Public/Event_Display.aspx?EventKey=2018NAPEC




This blog post was written by Kylie Wilson, a graduate assistant in the Kinesiology Department at the University of Northern Iowa