Thursday, November 16, 2017

Transition in APE: Part 1

In this episode, I had an in-depth conversation with two experts on the transition process and how to integrate students with disabilities into community recreational settings. The panelists included former guest Lara Brickhouse, the 2017 SHAPE APE teacher of the year and an APE teacher who works with students with disabilities during the transition process; and Dr. Robert Arnhold, a professor and director of the adapted physical activity program at Slippery Rock University. Dr. Arnhold also assists with a transition program at Slippery Rock University that focuses on daily living skills, work skills, and health for students in the transition process. Below is a short video showing the tremendous things happening at the transition program at Slippery Rock University.



This podcast is part one of a two part episode. Part one focuses specifically on (a) what the transition process is in special education, (b) the APE teachers' role in the transition process, and (c) how to develop community connections that will lead to meaningful opportunities for students with disabilities to be active in their communities.




In addition, here is a link to the SHAPE America Guidance Document, "Providing Community-Based PE Services For Students With Disabilities in Special Education Transition Programs".  This document provides information on strategies an APE teacher can implement to ensure students with disabilities are successful in their transition process. 

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Minnesota Adapted Physical Education Conference/Leadership Podcast: Part 2

In this 2nd part of a two part episode, I had the opportunity to sit down and have in-depth conversations with multiple experts who were somehow connected to the Minnesota Developmental Adapted Physical Education (DAPE) conference. In this episode I was able to meet with two of the DAPE keynote speakers who discussed their presentations and why their topics were of great importance to the field.  The two keynote speakers were Lara Brickhouse, the 2017 SHAPE APE teacher of the year; and Dr. Suzanna Dillon, my dissertation adviser :) and the president of the National Consortium for Physical Education for Individuals with Disabilities. With listening to this podcast, it is my hope that (1) some of the listeners learn about the great things that are occurring at APE conferences and the impact of that leadership has on our field; and (2) that if you are in a state that does not have an APE conference of leadership, that you might consider developing one yourself or with a small group of other passionate APE teachers. 



On another note, I recently had a publication of my own in the field of visual impairments and motor behavior. The article specifically focuses on how children with visual impairments balance under different learning cues. Check it out and let me know your thoughts! 


Thursday, September 28, 2017

Minnesota Adapted Physical Education Conference/Leadership Podcast

First, I want to apologize to my listeners, as I have been away from my podcasting and blogging duties for sometime now. I have another podcast, on working with speech and language therapist, that had some audio quality issues, which should be released soon as well. In my last episode, I discussed the idea that I wanted to create a few concept episodes focusing on specific disabilities. However, through the turbulent life of a person working on their dissertation, I ended up not being able to make that happen in a timely fashion. But I was given another opportunity to give you all an episode that focuses on an area that we in the world of APE do not get to focus much of our time on, professional development and leadership in APE. In this episode, I had the opportunity to sit down and have in-depth conversations with multiple experts who were somehow connected to the Minnesota Developmental Adapted Physical Education (DAPE) conference. In this episode I was able to meet with some DAPE members who discuss why they attend the DAPE conference every year.  In addition, I was also able to talk to two board members of the DAPE leadership committee, Mike Doyle and Jennifer Heebink, on why they decided to join the DAPE leadership and what their roles on the leadership committee. Lastly, we found out a little bit about the history of the DAPE conference. With listening to this podcast, it is my hope that (1) some of the listeners learn about the great things that are occurring at APE conferences and the impact of that leadership has on our field; and (2) that if you are in a state that does not have an APE conference of leadership, that you might consider developing one yourself or with a small group of other passionate APE teachers. 

This podcast is part one of a two part episode. In part two, we will have interviews with the two keynote speakers, Lara Brickhouse, the 2017 SHAPE APE teacher of the year; and Dr. Suzanna Dillon, my dissertation adviser :) and the president of the National Consortium for Physical Education for Individuals with Disabilities 


Resources
Please take a look at the DAPE website, as it has a bunch of resources for APE teachers!

They have also developed an amazing document that covers all sorts of topics on APE and gives ideas
on best practices within APE. It is called the Minnesota DAPE BEST PRACTICE Operational Guide.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Podcast 22: Autism in a PE setting Part 2

In this episode, I had the opportunity to sit down and have an in-depth conversation with a panel of experts on teaching children with autism in a physical education setting. The panelist for this podcast are all professors and researchers within the field of adapted physical education and specialize in physical education for children with autism. The panelist were Dr. Martin Block, a professor of adapted physical education in the department of Kinesiology at Virginia University and the author of the textbook A Teacher's Guide To Adapted Physical Education: Including Students with Disabilities in Sports and Recreation; Dr. Sean Healy an assistant professor in adapted physical education in the department of Kinesiology at Humboldt University; and Melissa Bittner a  past podcast guest and who recently finished up her dissertation and will begin teaching and conducting research next fall in adapted physical education in the department of Kinesiology at California State University Long Beach. 


This podcast is part two of a two part episode. Part two focuses specifically on how to work with bullying and children with autism and current research trends in the field of autism and physical activity. 

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Podcast 22: Autism in Physical Education, Part 1

In this episode, I had the opportunity to sit down and have an in-depth conversation with a panel of experts on teaching children with autism in a physical education setting. The panelist for this podcast are all professors and researchers within the field of adapted physical education and specialize in physical education for children with autism. The panelist were Dr. Martin Block, a professor of adapted physical education in the department of Kinesiology at Virginia University and the author of the textbook A Teacher's Guide To Adapted Physical Education: Including Students with Disabilities in Sports and Recreation; Dr. Sean Healy an assistant professor in adapted physical education in the department of Kinesiology at Humboldt University; and Melissa Bittner a  past podcast guest and fellow Texas Woman's University PhD candidate who is finishing up her dissertation and will begin teaching and conducting research next fall in adapted physical education in the department of Kinesiology at California State University Long Beach. 

This podcast is part one of a two part episode. Part one focuses specifically on (a) what is autism and how has the definition recently changed, (b) motor delays in children with autism, and (c) evidence based practices to use with children with autism.


As the panelist on this episode are all accomplished researchers in the field of adapted physical education and autism they gave recommendations on recent research and literature to inform viewers about research in the field. Below are some of their recommendations. 

Melissa Bittner and colleagues (2017) recently published a research article on the topic of using technology (i.e., ExerciseBuddy application), which uses video modeling and visual supports, when teaching children with autism motor skills. They compared a group of students when using the technology to being taught using a more traditional practice teaching style. An Actiheart accelerometer was used to measure their energy expenditure and heart rate. The findings were when students were taught using the application, they had significantly higher peak energy expenditure and peak heart rate response when performing the locomotor skills from the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (Ulrich, 2000). 


Michelle Grenier's Physical Education for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Comprehensive Approach (2012) is a textbook that gives strategies and tools to help physical education teachers design a curriculum that includes students with autism. 

The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder is a wonderful website which promotes and informs practitioners about evidence-based practices to use when teaching children with autism. 

Sunday, April 2, 2017

Podcast 21: Including Disability Sport in Physical Education

  In this episode, I had the opportunity to sit down and have an in-depth discussion with Dr. Ronald Davis on the topic of implementing disability sport within a general physical education setting. The podcasts focuses specifically on (a) how Dr. Davis got involved in disability sport, (b) the definition of disability sport,(c) how to integrate disability sport units into a general physical education setting, and (d) working with wounded veterans and integrating them back into their communities through sport (see Project INVEST). 
  Dr. Ronald W. Davis, is a professor of Adapted Physical Education in the department of Kinesiology at Texas Woman’s University. He has over 30 years of experience in higher education promoting professional development and advocating for people with disabilities. Dr. Davis has published extensively both nationally and internationally on injuries to elite athletes with disabilities, legal mandates for those with disabilities, training for people with disabilities, and related topics. You can find his textbook Teaching Disability Sports here. In addition, to the podcast interview, a YouTube video is attached which comes with the textbook. The video shows an in-depth look at how to properly teach wheelchair basketball.







  On another note, recently my colleagues and I had the honor to be published in the Journal of Frontiers in Public Health. I wanted to share with you all our article, especially as this journal is public access. The article takes an in-depth examination of recent findings from associations that exercise is an evidence-based practice to use when teaching children with autism. The findings explain that exercise can be used as an evidence-based practice but this is only based on evidence from one well-designed study. Please click here to read the entire article. 

Dillon, S., Adams, D., Goudy, L., Bittner, M., McNamara, S (2017). A systematic review: exercise as         an evidence-based practice for individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Frontiers in Public             Health, 290(4), 1-8.

Saturday, January 21, 2017

Podcast 20: Interview with TGMD Assessment Creator Dr. Dale Ulrich

This is a very special episode where I was able to meet and interview Dr. Dale Ulrich. Dr. Ulrich is one of the most influential APE professionals in the field. Dr. Ulrich is the creator of the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD) and is a professor at the University of Michigan in Kinesiology. In this podcast we discussed how and why to practitioners use the TGMD for assessment purposes, the use of the TGMD for placement and eligibility purposes, and how the new TGMD-3 differs from the TGMD-2.



In the last episode, I meant to share some materials on physical educators using tablet technology to monitor IEP goals. In the podcast, I briefly discuss this great article which was featured recently in the Journal for Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (JOPERD) on using tablet technology to monitor IEP goals (Lavay, Sakai, Ortiz, Roth, 2015). In this article, they review how to best use spreadsheet apps (e.g.,Excel, Sheets) to collect data on different skills and goals created for each student. The article outlines how to use cloud-based file storage systems (e.g., Dropbox, Google Docs) which allow for easy transfer of data between devices which helps to update goals and objectives for students with disabilities. The mobility of a tablet allows PE teachers to utilize multiple devices to collect, manipulate, analyze and share assessment data, which is so hard to regularly collect and use on paper. 

Here are two videos created by one of the authors, Ortiz, which breakdown how to create tracking documents for PE teachers. 




Lavay, B., Sakai, J., Ortiz, C., & Roth, K. (2015). Tablet Technology to Monitor Physical Education IEP Goals and Benchmarks. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance86(6), 16-23.